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‘Samson’ Category

  1. 1980 SAMSON ketch

    October 19, 2012 by EVAN

    About this Sailboat:

    Runs and sails, needs TLC and restoration.. same model as one for $80,000

    Equipment on Board:


  2. 1999 Samson SeaBreeze

    October 5, 2011 by EVAN

    About this Sailboat:

    The following description should be tempered with the understanding that this yacht was subsequently stolen and run aground while the thieves attempted their getaway. It listed by the Port Bow and took on water through one tide exchange. The stern remained high and dry. The engine was immediately pickled and the starter and alternator were rebuilt. Some of the wall paneling in the forward areas was adversely affected and should be replaced. Although they were new, the batteries needed replacement as well as some of the wiring. Currently there are new house & starting batteries with new cables. Most of the electronics were compromised & have been removed. There are new replacements for the VHF and wind generator. The davits and solar panels are missing. Here is a chance to obtain a passage-making live-aboard yacht for a drastic discount and some sweat equity.

    This yacht was being commissioned and was almost finished. It is a 55′ Cutter-rigged Center Cockpit Ketch with a deck house. 2″ fiberglass over ferralite core composite. Hull & deck professionally constructed by designer. Triple redundancy for weather-tightness. Kind motion in seaway. Beautiful all wood interior. USCG Documented. Located St. James, S. Pine Island, FL. Set-up to cruise the world in a custom newly outfitted yacht for a fraction of the price of a production boat! This yacht was assessed at $285,000 replacement cost.
    The boat ranks with the most solid. Unlike steel, (the other real solid construction), there is not the issue with rust & corrosion. And the surface is like any other fiberglass construction, very fair.

    *Please contact for more photos and details.

    Equipment on Board:

    Zero hours on 135 hp Perkins 6-354. The engine is undergoing reassembly and has new liners, pistons, rings, wrist pins, bearings, and machine work on the head & crankshaft. Block was ported & polished. All the parts are present.
    Zero hours on Velvet Drive transmission. Dual Racors w/ vacuum gauges. New VDO instrument package, 90 amp alt w/ 60 amp spare. New 8 kw engine driven generator, Air Wind Generator, 2 banks of 4 – 4d house batteries, 1 bank of 2 – g27 starting batteries, the solar panels and wind generator were all we needed to keep the batteries fully charged. 21 x 15 prop w/ spare. Hynautic H/D Helm Pump, Cylinder & Reservoir. Cetek Autopilot, Quiet Flush Head w/ Macerator (needs new pump), designer tile shower and lavatory, 18 gallon water heater w/ manifold system, 125 gallons water in tanks Dow/Filmtec Watermaker, Icom all band/ all mode SSB incl. Email w/ remote panel, Raytheon VHS, Raymarine Digital Daylight-viewable Fishfinder w/ Speed, Log, Temp. Transducer. Alden Weather Fax. Dual Air Marine 16000 BTU Reverse Cycle A/C Units w/ digital controls. Xantrex 3500 watt Inverter/Charger w/ computer control. Security Alarm System. 450 gallons fuel, estimated 2700 mi. range. Transfer pump to allow fuel to be pumped from side to side and used as transferable ballast. Huge Anchor Locker, Spacious V-Berth w/ double closets, Mid-ship Stateroom, 2 Heads, 15 Opening Ports. Adler Barbour Refrigeration System (new, needs installation), Huge Icebox,(I can fit inside), Huge Freezer. 3 Burner Range & Oven. Rigging by JSI w/ zero hours, Selden booms w/ jiffy reefing, Garhauer Series 40 Blocks, 8 Rope Clutches, 11 winches, 7 Sails. 35 lb. CQR, 45 lb. CQR and 30 lb. Danforth Anchors, 200′-High Test 3/8″ Chain with over 600′ rode. S/L 1200GD Windlass. Decks & Topsides recently painted, Hull w/ 5 coats Water Barrier & 2 coats Trinidad Anti-fouling.
    The core is stainless 1/4″ rod grid with expanded wire mesh laid over, filled with an epoxy mortar. The core is 3/4″ thick. Then up to 2 1/4″ fiberglass epoxy resin laid over to the surface. The epoxy in the mortar bonds with the FRE and they have similar expansion/contraction characteristics. The thickness of the FRE layup depends on the location and potential stress requirements. With an exception of the foredeck, the deck has an inch less FRE than the hull. One primary advantage of this method is there are not any joints. The hull, keel, deck, even the cockpit coamings are one unit. The solid core keeps the boat from flexing so the FRE is not subject to crazing or other common problems associated with standard fiberglass construction. The only drawback I can think of is that it is difficult to bore through the structure. The FRE is easy, but the core is like boring through rock laced with steel and requires methods used in boring through reinforced concrete.